Disability Awareness

Disability Awareness

Two teen boys in suits reading from a document in front of a crowd of other teens

The Resolution to Increase Accessibility for Participants highlights the small yet important ways NFTY can improve its accessibility for three different groups of people.

Fletcher Block
Group of teen campers holding hands in a circle as if participating in a group activity

Camp Harlam is healthier because we opened ourselves up to and held ourselves accountable for making a change. We would never go back to the way it was before. 

Aaron Selkow
White computer keyboard featuring three blue buttons with varying disability symbols

Every February, Jewish communities worldwide join to advocate for inclusion of people with disabilities and mental health conditions to be active participants in Jewish life. 

Shelley Christensen
Hands holding a geometric red heart

In honor of Jewish Disability Awareness, Acceptance, and Inclusion Month, we offer a few suggestions to help congregations adopt further awareness and understanding of disabilities.

Rabbi Edythe Held Mencher, L.C.S.W.
Rabbi David Saperstein hugs Rabbi Lynne Landsberg

It is with great sadness that we share news of the passing of Rabbi Lynne F. Landsberg, z’l

Rabbi Jonah Dov Pesner, Rabbi David Saperstein, & Barbara Weinstein
Close-up of exterior of U.S. Capitol dome

Begun as a grassroots initiative in 2009, JDAIM makes our Jewish community more understanding, welcoming, and supportive of people with disabilities and their families.

Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer
Teenage girls dressed in white with their arms around one anothers shoulders from behind

For the last few years, URJ Camp Harlam has continually sought to create an open and safe community – an environment that is understanding and accepting, where bias and prejudice will not be tolerated.

Lisa David
Smiling campers in Camp Harlam shirts looking off camera

Senator Tammy Duckworth's words rang in my ears as I thought about our work at camp – helping children be seen for who they are and their potential, rather than be limited or diminished for their struggles.

Lori Zlotoff
Closeup of pews

The purpose of this webinar, “Inclusive Worship for Clergy – A Discussion,” was to provide our communities with ideas and broader thinking around disabilities inclusion – particularly in worship and prayer settings. 

Cantor Rosalie Boxt
Closeup of a woman's hands resting on a wooden pew

The progress the Jewish community has made around inclusion is to be commended – but it’s important to be consistent with a message of inclusion, and not to confuse the concepts of diversity and inclusion.

Sheri Denkensohn-Trott