Jewish Disabilities Awareness and Inclusion Month

Jewish Disabilities Awareness and Inclusion Month

Group of teen campers holding hands in a circle as if participating in a group activity

Camp Harlam is healthier because we opened ourselves up to and held ourselves accountable for making a change. We would never go back to the way it was before. 

Aaron Selkow
White computer keyboard featuring three blue buttons with varying disability symbols

Every February, Jewish communities worldwide join to advocate for inclusion of people with disabilities and mental health conditions to be active participants in Jewish life. 

Shelley Christensen
Close-up of exterior of U.S. Capitol dome

Begun as a grassroots initiative in 2009, JDAIM makes our Jewish community more understanding, welcoming, and supportive of people with disabilities and their families.

Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer
Teenage girls dressed in white with their arms around one anothers shoulders from behind

For the last few years, URJ Camp Harlam has continually sought to create an open and safe community – an environment that is understanding and accepting, where bias and prejudice will not be tolerated.

Lisa David
Smiling campers in Camp Harlam shirts looking off camera

Senator Tammy Duckworth's words rang in my ears as I thought about our work at camp – helping children be seen for who they are and their potential, rather than be limited or diminished for their struggles.

Lori Zlotoff
Female teen surrounded by three younger kids

Synagogue professional need to find ways to communicate to our families that we will provide the resources to ensure their children get a Jewish education.

Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer
Closeup of pews

The purpose of this webinar, “Inclusive Worship for Clergy – A Discussion,” was to provide our communities with ideas and broader thinking around disabilities inclusion – particularly in worship and prayer settings. 

Cantor Rosalie Boxt
Closeup of a woman's hands resting on a wooden pew

The progress the Jewish community has made around inclusion is to be commended – but it’s important to be consistent with a message of inclusion, and not to confuse the concepts of diversity and inclusion.

Sheri Denkensohn-Trott
Colorful candles shaped like the number 10 lit atop a birthday cake

Looking back over the past 10 years, Jewish communities around the world have embraced Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month in February. 

Shelly Christensen