URJ Camp Harlam

URJ Camp Harlam

Group of teen campers holding hands in a circle as if participating in a group activity

Camp Harlam is healthier because we opened ourselves up to and held ourselves accountable for making a change. We would never go back to the way it was before. 

Aaron Selkow
Teenage girls dressed in white with their arms around one anothers shoulders from behind

For the last few years, URJ Camp Harlam has continually sought to create an open and safe community – an environment that is understanding and accepting, where bias and prejudice will not be tolerated.

Lisa David

I recently heard about a beautiful woman who was known for, well, being beautiful. She was accustomed to being stared at and was repeatedly told, by strangers and loved ones alike, just how beautiful she was. While flattering, this constant focus on her appearance left her feeling judged solely on her looks, with no one seeing past her beauty to learn about her intelligence, her experiences, or her other contributions to society. As the woman grew older, she continued to receive acknowledgments of her beauty, but they were less frequent and less intrusive – until she developed ALS and was confined to a wheelchair. As in her youth, people stared at her – and as in her youth, it didn’t feel good. No one saw past her disability to learn about her intelligence, her experiences, or her true contributions to society. With some disabilities, visibility can, at times, be valuable as a means to increase awareness and prompt important discussions about disabilities and inclusion. However, we have to be able to see past the disability to learn about the person behind it. We must learn to see disabilities as just one part of an individual’s identity without letting the disability define who she is or what she can do.

Cori Miller