Civil Rights

Civil Rights

Submitted by Temple Sinai, Washington, DC; Temple Micah, Washington, DC; Washington Hebrew Congregation, DC; Temple Shalom, Chevy Chase, MD; and Temple Emanuel, Kensington, MD; to the 68th Union for Reform Judaism General Assembly

Background

Year Adopted: 
2005

Board of Trustees
September 1978
New York, New York

Be it resolved that the UAHC affirms its support for voting representation in both Houses of Congress for the residents of the District of Columbia and urges that respective states of the United States speedily ratify the constitutional amendment now pending that will grant such representation.

Year Adopted: 
1978

WHEREAS in 1967 the 49th General Assembly of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations adopted a resolution on Selective Service, urging reform of the Selective Service laws "to protect individual conscience and to eliminate inequities."

These inequities have not been corrected and the passage of time has further aggravated the tension and injustice widely felt in America, particularly by young people.

Year Adopted: 
1969

The rise of extremism in some elements of American life--including episodes of anti-Semitism and the growing impact of the radical right--represents a clear and present danger to the tradition of American pluralism and a distortion of religious precepts in political life. The Reform Jewish movement has always had a commitment to the ethical values of Judaism and their relevance to contemporary society. This prophetic mandate assumes new urgency today because of the rise of extremism, both theological and political.

Year Adopted: 
1981

WHEREAS the Jewish tradition is characterized by its sensitive concern for rectifying injustice in whatever form or guise it may be found and Jews have a special historic empathy with the plight of people who are deprived of their constitutional rights, who had to leave their homes and relocate in camps isolated from the rest of the community; and

Year Adopted: 
1981

As we who subscribe to the belief in the brotherhood of man, survey the national scene, we note with great regret the discriminations from which many Americans suffer at the hands of their fellow-Americans. Such discriminations because of race, color or creed are a violation of the will of God and of the principle of equal liberty to all so basic to the American philosophy.

Year Adopted: 
1950

Background

The Mishna tells us: "In every generation, we are commanded to view ourselves as if each of us was personally brought forth out of Egypt" ( Tractate P'sachim 10:5). This mandate highlights the importance of remembering the injustice of slavery throughout the years.

Year Adopted: 
2003

Because of our profound commitment to the equality of all men under God, the Union of American Hebrew Congregations has consistently opposed every form of discrimination.

Out of this conviction, we have supported the decision of the U. S. Supreme Court in the school segregation cases and have pledged to do all within.

Year Adopted: 
1959

The citizens of the nation's capital have a status which is anomalous in a democratic society. They have no local government, no elected officials responsible to them, no ballot by which to express their will in their own local affairs.

We are persuaded that the problems of the District of Columbia should be solved within that democratic process which is the cornerstone of American life.

We urge the Congress of the United States to free the District of Columbia from its current anomalous status and grant it a workable form of home rule.

Year Adopted: 
1963