Economic Justice

Economic Justice

The Jewish tradition is distinguished by its sensitive concern for the poor, the weak, the sick, the elderly, the disinherited, and the stranger at the gate, both at home and overseas. Accordingly, the Union of American Hebrew Congregations has consistently supported governmental initiatives to eliminate poverty, inequality, and social injustice, both in American life and, through sensitive programs throughout the years, for the advancement of many peoples.

Year Adopted: 
1973

WHEREAS, The Committee on Symagog and School Extension has incorporated in its program Student Welfare Work whereby the Jewish young men and women attending colleges and universities are to be inspired with loyalty to Judaism and pride in the faith of their fathers,

WHEREAS, The various religious denominations of our land and constructing chapels and churches around and near University and College campuses, and

WHEREAS, It is of the most vital need that the Jewish students also be given opportunity for religious culture,

Year Adopted: 
1913

Background

Judaism teaches us that poverty is destructive of human dignity and that helping people in need is a matter of fundamental principle, not an act of charity. From the time of the prophets, we have acted upon principle and adhered to the dictate, "There shall be no needy among you." (Deut. 15:4) Maimonides taught that the highest degree of tzedakah is to enable a person to earn his or her own livelihood.

Year Adopted: 
1995

In response to the horror of world hunger, a resolution was passed, clarifying that Board members should be given the opportunity to donate to a unique, new program called MAZON, through a three per cent surcharge on their meals. This would be strictly an individualized volunteer effort. No member is mandated to contribute to MAZON.

Year Adopted: 
1986

The recently issued report of the President's National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders declares as its basic conclusion: "Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white—separate and unequal". That prospect presents the gravest domestic danger to the traditions and structures of American democracy.

Unless our society keeps pace with the massive social and economic needs and the rising expectations of our deprived citizens, further polarizations of the American people will occur.

Year Adopted: 
1968

Background

The Executive Committee of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations is deeply distressed by the decision of the Bush Administration to delay the approval of loan guarantees to the State of Israel. These guarantees were intended to meet an immediate need: the resettlement in Israel of hundreds of thousands of new immigrants from the Soviet Union and Ethiopia. The absorption of the huge influx of immigrants is an urgent, humanitarian concern. We believe that their fate should not be held hostage to unresolved issues in the Middle East peace process.

Year Adopted: 
1992

Background

Year Adopted: 
1981

The continuing economic crisis in American life threatens the quality of life of all Americans and imposes a disproportionate burden of social injustice on the elderly, the young, and members of minority groups.

Year Adopted: 
1976

Board of Trustees
May 1979
New York

WHEREAS Article V of the United States Constitution provides for two methods of proposing constitutional amendments-a two-thirds vote of Congress or the call for a constitutional convention by two-thirds of the states; and

WHEREAS in the nearly 200 years since the ratification of the United States Constitution, the method of a two-thirds vote of Congress for proposing amendments has worked well and responsibly and has been the only method used; and

Year Adopted: 
1979