Foreign Policy

Foreign Policy

Adopted by the General Assembly
Union of American Hebrew Congregations
October 29-November 2, 1997 Dallas

Background

Year Adopted: 
1997

60th General Assembly
November 1989
New Orleans, Louisiana

BACKGROUND
The massacre of over 1.5 million Armenians beginning in 1915 by the Ottoman Turks and the subsequent exile of an additional 500,000 Armenians is one of the most shameful chapters of modern history.

Year Adopted: 
1989

Background

Year Adopted: 
2007
Background

In March 1992, Bosnia-Herzegovina (Bosnia) declared its independence from the former Yugoslavia. Since then, the country has been devastated by brutal war that has created over a million refugees and has resulted in the death of over 250,000 people. The horrors of ethnic cleansing, internment camps, mass murder, rape as a military tactic, and the separation of families, have been inflicted upon the population. These genocidal activities are morally repugnant to the entire civilized world.

Year Adopted: 
1995

In Jewish religious tradition, as well as in Jewish historical experience, racism is an ultimate evil. Our prophets and rabbis taught that all human beings are created in the image of God and have an equal claim to equity and justice. Throughout its history, the UAHC has spoken with vigor and clarity against racial segregation and discrimination in the United States and everywhere else in the world.

Year Adopted: 
1985

Background

Year Adopted: 
2013

BACKGROUND
Because of its northern climate Canada did not, in earlier days, have the powerful attraction exerted by the United States. During the 19th century, it had to advertise in European papers for immigrants and promised them travel bonuses. At first there were few restrictions on who was to be admitted, but in the course of time certain xenophobic tendencies developed, especially regarding Asian immigrants. These tendencies were sharpened during the time of the Nazi

Year Adopted: 
1989

The Board of Trustees of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations resolves:

Year Adopted: 
1990

The debate currently being waged in our nation over whether to ratify the proposed Panama Canal treaty is a necessary and healthy manifestation of our democratic process. All Americans, individually and in organized fashion, have an obligation to express themselves on this crucial issue.

The 1903 treaty gave the United States power over the Canal Zone "as if sovereign." While the United States has exercised virtually complete jurisdiction over the Canal Zone, that treaty did not make the zone part of the United States.

Year Adopted: 
1977

"The Union of American Hebrew Congregations in council assembled declares we are unalterably opposed to Communism, Fascism and Nazism; we condemn all religious and racial persecutions; we re-affirm our devotion to the principles of democracy with its noble concepts of mutual respect and good-will which maintain the dignity of the individual and his equal rights under the Constitution of the United States, regardless of race, color, or religion; we

Year Adopted: 
1939