Reform Movement Institutions

Reform Movement Institutions

"Whereas the impulse for true social service springs from the basic and cardinal teachings of Judaism traditionally expressed through and by the synagogue, be it resolved that the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, in Council assembled, recognizes that individual Jewish responsibilities include the duty to support the synagogue and the obligation to uphold its position in the spiritual, cultural, philanthropic, and other beneficent activities of Jewish life."

Year Adopted: 
1939

Seventeen years after the establishment of the Commission on Social Action of Reform Judaism there remains a significant number of our congregations without social action or community affairs committees. We find this incongruous, particularly at a time when the religious aspect of our society is being challenged to more relevantly bring to bear its great prophetic message on the problems of our world.

Year Adopted: 
1967

(Note: the information below relates to the 2002 resolution. Questions about the SCRF can be asked and answered by joining the Small Congregations Group in The Tent).

 

PURPOSE: To provide assistance to small, and underserved UAHC congregations.

PLAN: To grant or loan small, and underserved congregations sufficient money so that, together with their own available funds, the congregations may better serve their congregants.

Year Adopted: 
2002
Be it hereby resolved that:
  1. The Synagogue Resources Loan Fund ("SRLF") Committee may recommend to the UAHC President and Chairman that grants or loans be made from the SRLF to particular small synagogues or consortia of small synagogues for the purpose of enhancing the development of those synagogues by providing financial assistance for such matters as (but not limited to): supplementing compensation of clergy, educators or other professional staff; acquiring educational
Year Adopted: 
2000

Whereas, Reform Jewish Worship has allowed many symbols, customs, etc, of traditional Jewish Worship to fall into disuse; and

Whereas, It is the sense of this Convention that many of these forms should be re-introduced:

Year Adopted: 
1937
BACKGROUND

Meaningful and spiritually uplifting worship for all age groups is a major challenge facing Reform congregations. In light of changes that have emerged in Reform worship over the past 25-30 years, it is incumbent upon our congregations to re-examine their worship experience, making substantial and significant changes where necessary.

Year Adopted: 
2000

As the United States moves into a period of possibly serious economic difficulty and great uncertainty, the Board of Trustees affirms the determination of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations to extend effective leadership and guidance to our member congregations in coping with the economic challenge of our time. We reaffirm our deepest obligation to strengthen the synagogue as the preserver of Judaism and its historic values.

Year Adopted: 
1974

Background

The National Association of Temple Educators (NATE) has been a valued and productive partner in the family of Reform Judaism since 1955. The Reform Commission on Jewish Education (now the Joint Commission on Lifelong Jewish Learning) acknowledged NATE's importance in June 1956 by welcoming it as a collegial, professional affiliate, and the Union for Reform Judaism instituted NATE representation on the Union's Board of Trustees by amendment to its bylaws in November 1959.

Year Adopted: 
2005

n 1985 and 1995, the Union for Reform Judaism resolved to endorse and advance full time Jewish day school education as a viable option for Reform Jewish families seeking an integrated Jewish educational experience throughout the school year. Building on the success of the earliest Reform Jewish Day Schools established by visionary leadership at Congregation Rodeph Sholom in New York City and at Temple Beth Am in Miami, Florida, more than 15 new Reform Jewish

Year Adopted: 
2009

RABBI LEIPZIGER: When the 37th Council of the Union of the American Hebrew Congregation shall be seen in perspective, it will appear as a session of earnest self examination and honest self-criticism; a session giving new direction to the Union's hopes, a bolder vision of its goal.

Yet, it is only from measurable achievements that higher hopes do spring and it is only from accomplished tasks that new directions can be channeled.

Year Adopted: 
1941